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Title: Exchange biased anomalous Hall effect driven by frustration in a magnetic kagome lattice
Abstract

Co$$_{3}$$3Sn$$_{2}$$2S$$_{2}$$2is a ferromagnetic Weyl semimetal that has been the subject of intense scientific interest due to its large anomalous Hall effect. We show that the coupling of this material’s topological properties to its magnetic texture leads to a strongly exchange biased anomalous Hall effect. We argue that this is likely caused by the coexistence of ferromagnetism and geometric frustration intrinsic to the kagome network of magnetic ions, giving rise to spin-glass behavior and an exchange bias.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10154187
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Volume:
11
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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