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Title: Localization of binary black hole mergers with known inclination
ABSTRACT The localization of stellar-mass binary black hole mergers using gravitational waves is critical in understanding the properties of the binaries’ host galaxies, observing possible electromagnetic emission from the mergers, or using them as a cosmological distance ladder. The precision of this localization can be substantially increased with prior astrophysical information about the binary system. In particular, constraining the inclination of the binary can reduce the distance uncertainty of the source. Here, we present the first realistic set of localizations for binary black hole mergers, including different prior constraints on the binaries’ inclinations. We find that prior information on the inclination can reduce the localization volume by a factor of 3. We discuss two astrophysical scenarios of interest: (i) follow-up searches for beamed electromagnetic/neutrino counterparts and (ii) mergers in the accretion discs of active galactic nuclei.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1715661 1708028
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10157783
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
488
Issue:
3
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
4459 to 4463
ISSN:
0035-8711
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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