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Title: Simulate Forest Trees by Integrating L-System and 3D CAD Files
In this article, we propose a new approach for simulating trees, including their branches, sub-branches, and leaves. This approach combines the theory of biological development, mathematical models, and computer graphics, producing simulated trees and forest with full geometry. Specifically, we adopt the Lindenmayer process to simulate the branching pattern of trees and modify the available measurements and dimensions of 3D CAD developed object files to create natural looking sub-branches and leaves. Randomization has been added to the placement of all branches, sub branches and leaves. To simulate a forest, we adopt Inhomogeneous Poisson process to generate random locations of trees. Our approach can be used to create complex structured 3D virtual environment for the purpose of testing new sensors and training robotic algorithms. We look forward to applying this approach to test biosonar sensors that mimick bats' fly in the simulated environment.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1762577
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10157879
Journal Name:
2020 3rd International Conference on Information and Computer Technologies (ICICT)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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