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This content will become publicly available on May 1, 2023

Title: Fast Simulation of Trees and Forests for Bat-inspired Sonar Sensing
To study the sensing mechanism of bat's biosonar system, we propose a fast simulation algorithm to generate natural-looking trees and forest---the primary living habitat of bats. We adopt 3D Lindenmayer system to create the fractal geometry of the trees, and add additional parameters, both globally and locally, to enable random variations of the tree structures. Random forest is then formed by placing simulated trees at random locations of a field according to a spatial point process. By employing a single algorithmic model with different numeric parameters, we can rapidly simulate 3D virtual environments with a wide variety of trees, producing detailed geometry of the foliage such as the leaf locations, sizes, and orientations. Written in C++ and visualized with openGL, our algorithm is fast to implement, easily parallable, and more adaptive to real-time visualization compared with existing alternative approaches. Our simulated environment can be used for general purposes such as studying new sensors or training remote sensing algorithms.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1762577
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10339711
Journal Name:
2022 5th International Conference on Information and Computer Technologies (ICICT)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
198-202
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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