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Title: Spin coherent quantum transport of electrons between defects in diamond
Abstract The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in diamond has rapidly emerged as an important solid-state system for quantum information processing. Whereas individual spin registers have been used to implement small-scale diamond quantum computing, the realization of a large-scale device requires the development of an on-chip quantum bus for transporting information between distant qubits. Here, we propose a method for coherent quantum transport of an electron and its spin state between distant NV centers. Transport is achieved by the implementation of spatial stimulated adiabatic Raman passage through the optical control of the NV center charge states and the confined conduction states of a diamond nanostructure. Our models show that, for two NV centers in a diamond nanowire, high-fidelity transport can be achieved over distances of order hundreds of nanometers in timescales of order hundreds of nanoseconds. Spatial adiabatic passage is therefore a promising option for realizing an on-chip spin quantum bus.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1914945
NSF-PAR ID:
10158659
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Nanophotonics
Volume:
8
Issue:
11
ISSN:
2192-8614
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1975 to 1984
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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