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Title: Micromagnetic simulations of first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams of framboidal greigite
SUMMARY Greigite is a sensitive environmental indicator and occurs commonly in nature as magnetostatically interacting framboids. Until now only the magnetic response of isolated non-interacting greigite particles have been modelled micromagnetically. We present here hysteresis and first-order reversal curve (FORC) simulations for framboidal greigite (Fe3S4), and compare results to those for isolated particles of a similar size. We demonstrate that these magnetostatic interactions alter significantly the framboid FORC response compared to isolated particles, which makes the magnetic response similar to that of much larger (multidomain) grains. We also demonstrate that framboidal signals plot in different regions of a FORC diagram, which facilitates differentiation between framboidal and isolated grain signals. Given that large greigite crystals are rarely observed in microscopy studies of natural samples, we suggest that identification of multidomain-like FORC signals in samples known to contain abundant greigite could be interpreted as evidence for framboidal greigite.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1827263
NSF-PAR ID:
10163041
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Geophysical Journal International
Volume:
222
Issue:
2
ISSN:
0956-540X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1126 to 1134
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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