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Title: Facile decoding of quantitative signatures from magnetic nanowire arrays
Abstract Magnetic nanoparticles have been proposed as contact-free minimal-background nanobarcodes, and yet it has been difficult to rapidly and reliably decode them in an assembly. Here, high aspect ratio nanoparticles, or magnetic nanowires (MNWs), are characterized using first-order reversal curves (FORC) to investigate quantitative decoding. We have synthesized four types of nanowires (differing in diameter) that might be used for barcoding, and identified four possible “signature” functions that might be used to quickly distinguish them. To test this, we have measured the signatures of several combination samples containing two or four different MNW types, and fit them to linear combinations of the individual type signatures to determine the volume ratios of the types. We find that the signature which determines the ratios most accurately involves only the slope of each FORC at its reversal field, which requires only 2–4 data points per FORC curve, reducing the measurement time by a factor of 10 to 50 compared to measuring the full FORC.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1642268
NSF-PAR ID:
10209706
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Volume:
10
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2045-2322
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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