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Title: A Wearable Meter That Actively Monitors the Continuity of E-Textile Circuits as They Are Sewn
The e-textile landscape has enabled creators to combine textile materiality with electronic capability. However, the tools that e-textile creators use have been adapted from traditional textile or hardware tools. This puts creators at a disadvantage, as e-textile projects present new and unique challenges that currently can only be addressed using a non-specialized toolset. This paper introduces the first iteration of a wearable e-textile debugging tool to assist novice engineers in problem solving e-textile circuitry errors. These errors are often only detected after the project is fully built and are resolved only by disassembling the circuit. Our tool actively monitors the continuity of the conductive thread as the user stitches, which enables the user to identify and correct circuitry errors as they create their project.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1742081
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10163652
Journal Name:
FabLearn 2020 - 9th Annual Conference on Maker Education (FabLearn ’20)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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