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Title: The ThreadBoard: Designing an E-Textile Rapid Prototyping Board
E-textiles, which embed circuitry into textile fabrics, blend art and creative expression with engineering, making it a popular choice for STEAM classrooms [6, 12]. Currently, e-textile development relies on tools intended for traditional embedded systems, which utilize printed circuit boards and insulated wires. These tools do not translate well to e-textiles, which utilize fabric and uninsulated conductive thread. This mismatch of tools and materials can lead to an overly complicated development process for novices. In particular, rapid prototyping tools for traditional embedded systems are poorly matched for e-textile prototyping. This paper presents the ThreadBoard, a tool that supports rapid prototyping of e-textile circuits. With rapid prototyping, students can test circuit designs and identify circuitry errors prior to their sewn project. We present the design process used to iteratively create the ThreadBoard’s layout, with the goal of improving its usability for e-textile creators.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1742081
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10285088
Journal Name:
TEI '21: Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 7
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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