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Title: STOIC: Serverless TeleOperable Hybrid Cloud for Machine Learning Applications on Edge Device
Serverless computing is a promising new event- driven programming model that was designed by cloud vendors to expedite the development and deployment of scalable web services on cloud computing systems. Using the model, developers write applications that consist of simple, independent, stateless functions that the cloud invokes on-demand (i.e. elastically), in response to system-wide events (data arrival, messages, web requests, etc.). In this work, we present STOIC (Serverless TeleOperable HybrId Cloud), an application scheduling and deployment system that extends the serverless model in two ways. First, it uses the model in a distributed setting and schedules application functions across multiple cloud systems. Second, STOIC sup- ports serverless function execution using hardware acceleration (e.g. GPU resources) when available from the underlying cloud system. We overview the design and implementation of STOIC and empirically evaluate it using real-world machine learning applications and multi-tier (e.g. edge-cloud) deployments. We find that STOIC’s combined use of edge and cloud resources is able to outperform using either cloud in isolation for the applications and datasets that we consider.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1703560
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10164154
Journal Name:
International Workshop on Smart Edge Computing and Networking
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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