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Title: Energy-Efficient Processing and Robust Wireless Cooperative Transmission for Edge Inference
Edge machine learning can deliver low-latency and private artificial intelligent (AI) services for mobile devices by leveraging computation and storage resources at the network edge. This paper presents an energy-efficient edge processing framework to execute deep learning inference tasks at the edge computing nodes whose wireless connections to mobile devices are prone to channel uncertainties. Aimed at minimizing the sum of computation and transmission power consumption with probabilistic quality-of-service (QoS) constraints, we formulate a joint inference tasking and downlink beamforming problem that is characterized by a group sparse objective function. We provide a statistical learning based robust optimization approach to approximate the highly intractable probabilistic-QoS constraints by nonconvex quadratic constraints, which are further reformulated as matrix inequalities with a rank-one constraint via matrix lifting. We design a reweighted power minimization approach by iteratively reweighted ℓ1 minimization with difference-of-convex-functions (DC) regularization and updating weights, where the reweighted approach is adopted for enhancing group sparsity whereas the DC regularization is designed for inducing rank-one solutions. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed approach outperforms other state-of-the-art approaches.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1711823
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10166317
Journal Name:
IEEE Internet of Things Journal
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 1
ISSN:
2372-2541
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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