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Title: Design Conjectures for Place-Based Science Learning About Water: Implementing Mobile Augmented Reality with Families
From a design-based research study with 31 families, we share the design conjectures that guided the first two iterations of research. The team developed a mobile augmented reality app focused on water-rock interactions to make earth sciences appealing to rural families. We iterated on one design element, the augmented reality visualizations, to understand how these AR elements influence families’ learning behavior in a children’s garden cave as well as their resulting geosciences knowledge. This analysis is an example of how design conjecture maps can be used to support research and development of mobile computer-supported collaborative learning opportunities for families in outdoor, informal learning settings.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1811424
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10168987
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for the Learning Sciences
Volume:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1225-1132
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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