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Title: LLAMA: The M BHσ relation of the most luminous local AGNs
Context. The M BH – σ ⋆ relation is considered a result of coevolution between the host galaxies and their supermassive black holes. For elliptical bulge hosting inactive galaxies, this relation is well established, but there is still discussion concerning whether active galaxies follow the same relation. Aims. In this paper, we estimate black hole masses for a sample of 19 local luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs; LLAMA) to test their location on the M BH – σ ⋆ relation. In addition, we test how robustly we can determine the stellar velocity dispersion in the presence of an AGN continuum and AGN emission lines, and as a function of signal-to-noise ratio. Methods. Supermassive black hole masses ( M BH ) were derived from the broad-line-based relations for H α , H β , and Pa β emission line profiles for Type 1 AGNs. We compared the bulge stellar velocity dispersion ( σ ⋆ ) as determined from the Ca II triplet (CaT) with the dispersion measured from the near-infrared CO (2-0) absorption features for each AGN and find them to be consistent with each other. We applied an extinction correction to the observed broad-line fluxes and we corrected the stellar more » velocity dispersion by an average rotation contribution as determined from spatially resolved stellar kinematic maps. Results. The H α -based black hole masses of our sample of AGNs were estimated in the range 6.34 ≤ log M BH  ≤ 7.75 M ⊙ and the σ ⋆CaT estimates range between 73 ≤  σ ⋆CaT  ≤ 227 km s −1 . From the so-constructed M BH  −  σ ⋆ relation for our Type 1 AGNs, we estimate the black hole masses for the Type 2 AGNs and the inactive galaxies in our sample. Conclusions. We find that our sample of local luminous AGNs is consistent with the M BH – σ ⋆ relation of lower luminosity AGNs and inactive galaxies, after correcting for dust extinction and the rotational contribution to the stellar velocity dispersion. « less
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1909297
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10171523
Journal Name:
Astronomy & Astrophysics
Volume:
634
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
A114
ISSN:
0004-6361
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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