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Title: TANGLED1 mediates microtubule interactions that may promote division plane positioning in maize

The microtubule cytoskeleton serves as a dynamic structural framework for mitosis in eukaryotic cells. TANGLED1 (TAN1) is a microtubule-binding protein that localizes to the division site and mitotic microtubules and plays a critical role in division plane orientation in plants. Here, in vitro experiments demonstrate that TAN1 directly binds microtubules, mediating microtubule zippering or end-on microtubule interactions, depending on their contact angle. Maize tan1 mutant cells improperly position the preprophase band (PPB), which predicts the future division site. However, cell shape–based modeling indicates that PPB positioning defects are likely a consequence of abnormal cell shapes and not due to TAN1 absence. In telophase, colocalization of growing microtubules ends from the phragmoplast with TAN1 at the division site suggests that TAN1 interacts with microtubule tips end-on. Together, our results suggest that TAN1 contributes to microtubule organization to ensure proper division plane orientation.

 
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Award ID(s):
1716972 1453726
NSF-PAR ID:
10172161
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.1083
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Cell Biology
Volume:
219
Issue:
8
ISSN:
0021-9525
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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  2. ABSTRACT

    Cell-division-plane orientation is critical for plant and animal development and growth. TANGLED1 (TAN1) and AUXIN-INDUCED IN ROOT CULTURES 9 (AIR9) are division-site-localized microtubule-binding proteins required for division-plane positioning. The single mutants tan1 and air9 of Arabidopsis thaliana have minor or no noticeable phenotypes, but the tan1 air9 double mutant has synthetic phenotypes including stunted growth, misoriented divisions and aberrant cell-file rotation in the root differentiation zone. These data suggest that TAN1 plays a role in non-dividing cells. To determine whether TAN1 is required in elongating and differentiating cells in the tan1 air9 double mutant, we limited its expression to actively dividing cells using the G2/M-specific promoter of the syntaxin KNOLLE (pKN:TAN1–YFP). Unexpectedly, in addition to rescuing division-plane defects, expression of pKN:TAN1–YFP rescued root growth and cell file rotation defects in the root-differentiation zone in tan1 air9 double mutants. This suggests that defects that occur in the meristematic zone later affect the organization of elongating and differentiating cells.

     
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  3. Introduction

    During proliferative plant cell division, the new cell wall, called the cell plate, is first built in the middle of the cell and then expands outward to complete cytokinesis. This dynamic process requires coordinated movement and arrangement of the cytoskeleton and organelles.

    Methods

    Here we use live-cell markers to track the dynamic reorganization of microtubules, nuclei, endoplasmic reticulum, and endomembrane compartments during division and the formation of the cell plate in maize leaf epidermal cells.

    Results

    The microtubule plus-end localized protein END BINDING1 (EB1) highlighted increasing microtubule dynamicity during mitosis to support rapid changes in microtubule structures. The localization of the cell-plate specific syntaxin KNOLLE, several RAB-GTPases, as well as two plasma membrane localized proteins was assessed after treatment with the cytokinesis-specific callose-deposition inhibitor Endosidin7 (ES7) and the microtubule-disrupting herbicide chlorpropham (CIPC). While ES7 caused cell plate defects inArabidopsis thaliana, it did not alter callose accumulation, or disrupt cell plate formation in maize. In contrast, CIPC treatment of maize epidermal cells occasionally produced irregular cell plates that split or fragmented, but did not otherwise disrupt the accumulation of cell-plate localized proteins.

    Discussion

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  4. Abstract Background

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    Here, we simulated how different attributes of tensile forces in the cell wall can orient and pattern the microtubule array in the cortex. We implemented a discrete model with transient microtubule behaviors influenced by local mechanical stress in order to probe the mechanisms of stress-dependent patterning. Specifically, we varied the sensitivity of four types of dynamic behaviors observed on the plus end of microtubules – growth, shrinkage, catastrophe, and rescue – to local stress. Then, we evaluated the extent and rate of microtubule alignments in a two-dimensional computational domain that reflects the structural organization of the cortical array in plant cells.

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