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Title: Preparing the Future Workforce in Advanced Manufacturing: The Case of South Korea
In this research paper, we explore how advanced manufacturing has led South Korea’s economy for the past several decades. It accounts for 4.5 million jobs, which is about 10% of South Korea’s population. However, the era of the Industry 4.0 is transforming the nature of the workforce in advanced manufacturing industry. Many workers could lose their jobs to automation, but it is likely that they will also find new jobs in similar occupation. Thus, it will be crucial for various stakeholders in the industry: employee, employers, educators, and policy akers to prepare for this changing nature of the workforce. However, our review of policy and research suggests that little is known about the extent to which South Korea is ready for the changing nature of the workforce in advanced manufacturing industry. In this paper, we will explore South Korea’s readiness for the change in advanced manufacturing workforce. Specifically, we will provide a review of literature relating to the impact of automation in advanced manufacturing workforce and how South Korea is preparing workers for the Industry 4.0. We conclude with promising directions for research. Taken together, this paper will offer several promising directions for further investigation into how South Korea can more » prepare for the impact of automation in advanced manufacturing workforce « less
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1700581
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10172228
Journal Name:
ASEE annual conference exposition
ISSN:
2153-5965
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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