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Title: Work in Progress: Involving Teachers in International Community Engaged Learning Projects to Enhance Their Understanding of Engineering and Intercultural Awareness
The University of Dayton and Central State University are engaged in a new collaborative NSF Research Experience for Teachers project that has an emphasis on international engineering research focused on human-centered design and appropriate technology for developing countries. This three year project will engage 36 G6-12 in-service and pre-service teachers in a variety of engineering research opportunities through the University of Dayton’s Engineers in Technical Humanitarian Opportunities for Service-Learning (ETHOS) Center which focuses on engineering and community engaged learning. This paper will summarize the project, present observations from the spring participant sessions, and discuss the unique opportunities and challenges associated with involving teachers in international community engaged learning.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1855239
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10175914
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 2020 American Society of Engineering Education Annual Conference
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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