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Title: Evaluating a Cybersecurity Training Program for Non-computing Major Undergraduate ROTC Students
There is a rapidly growing demand for individuals in cybersecurity and a deficit of persons able to fill those roles. To help meet this need, students not majoring in computing can be utilized to fulfill this demand by exposing them to date mining, cybersecurity practices, and applications of these concepts in the field. This paper presents findings from a twenty-one-week program in which minority undergraduate college students all members of the Reserve Officer Training Coprs (ROTC), were taught computer programming, natural language processing, data visualization, and computer vision fundamentals. Midshipmen and cadets used their newly gained knowledge, teamwork, planning, and communication skills to develop a threat dectection prototype using publicly available social media data. Resuls from pre and post python assessments and post-program interviews that recorded participant attitudes and sefl-efficacy are reported to highlight the programs' effectiveness.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1818458
NSF-PAR ID:
10177911
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of RESPECT’20: the 2020 Research on Equity and Sustained Participation in Engineering, Computing, and Technology Conference
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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