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Title: Oxygen induced promotion of electrochemical reduction of CO2 via co-electrolysis
Abstract

Harnessing renewable electricity to drive the electrochemical reduction of CO2is being intensely studied for sustainable fuel production and as a means for energy storage. Copper is the only monometallic electrocatalyst capable of converting CO2to value-added products, e.g., hydrocarbons and oxygenates, but suffers from poor selectivity and mediocre activity. Multiple oxidative treatments have shown improvements in the performance of copper catalysts. However, the fundamental underpinning for such enhancement remains controversial. Here, we combine reactivity, in-situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and computational investigations to demonstrate that the presence of surface hydroxyl species by co-electrolysis of CO2with low concentrations of O2can dramatically enhance the activity of copper catalyzed CO2electroreduction. Our results indicate that co-electrolysis of CO2with an oxidant is a promising strategy to introduce catalytically active species in electrocatalysis.

 
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Award ID(s):
1805022
NSF-PAR ID:
10178552
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Nature Publishing Group
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Volume:
11
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2041-1723
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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