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Title: Online Reconfiguration of Regularity-Based Resource Partitions in Cyber-Physical Systems
We consider the problem of resource provisioning for real-time cyber-physical applications in an open system environment where there does not exist a global resource scheduler that has complete knowledge of the real-time performance requirements of each individual application that shares the resources with the other applications. Regularity-based Resource Partition (RRP) model is an effective strategy to hierarchically partition and assign various resource slices among the applications. However, RRP model does not consider changes in resource requests from the applications at run time. To allow for the run time adaptation to change resource requirements, we consider in this paper the issues in online resource partition reconfiguration, including semantics issues that arise in configuration transitions that may cause application failures. Based on the reconfiguration semantics, we study the online resource reconfigurability problem under the RRP model where the availability factors of resource partitions may be reconfigured during run time. We formalize the Dynamic Partition Reconfiguration (DPR) problem and provide a solution to this problem. Extensive experiments have been conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach in different scenarios. We also present a case study using the autonomous F1/10 model car; the controller of the F1/10 car requires resource adaptation to more » satisfy the computing needs of its PID controller and vision system under different operating conditions. Our implementation demonstrates the effectiveness and benefit of online resource partition reconfiguration using the DPR approach in a real system. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1718738
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10179102
Journal Name:
IEEE Real-Time Systems Symposium
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
495 to 507
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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