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Title: The Lightning and Dual-Polarization Radar Characteristics of Three Hail-Accumulating Thunderstorms
Abstract Thunderstorms that produce hail accumulations at the surface can impact residents by obstructing roadways, closing airports, and causing localized flooding from hail-clogged drainages. These storms have recently gained an increased interest within the scientific community. However, differences that are observable in real time between these storms and storms that produce nonimpactful hail accumulations have yet to be documented. Similarly, the characteristics within a single storm that are useful to quantify or predict hail accumulations are not fully understood. This study uses lightning and dual-polarization radar data to characterize hail accumulations from three storms that occurred on the same day along the Colorado–Wyoming Front Range. Each storm’s characteristics are verified against radar-derived hail accumulation maps and in situ observations. The storms differed in maximum accumulation, either producing 22 cm, 7 cm, or no accumulation. The magnitude of surface hail accumulations is found to be dependent on a combination of in-cloud hail production, storm translation speed, and hailstone melting. The optimal combination for substantial hail accumulations is enhanced in-cloud hail production, slow storm speed, and limited hailstone melting. However, during periods of similar in-cloud hail production, lesser accumulations are derived when storm speed and/or hailstone melting, identified by radar presentation, is sufficiently large. These results will aid forecasters in identifying when hail accumulations are occurring in real time.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1661583
NSF-PAR ID:
10180335
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Weather and Forecasting
Volume:
35
Issue:
4
ISSN:
0882-8156
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1583 to 1603
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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