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Title: Structural, morphological and magnetotransport properties of composite semiconducting and semimetallic InAs/GaSb superlattice structure
Properties of a double-period InAs/GaSb superlattice grown by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy are presented. Precise growth conditions at the InAs/GaSb heterojunction yielded abrupt heterointerfaces and superior material quality as verified by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Moreover, high-resolution TEM imaging and elemental composition profiling of the InAs/GaSb heterostructure demonstrated abrupt atomic transitions between each Sb- or As-containing epilayer. An 8 × 8 k · p model is used to compute the electronic band structure of the constituent long- and short-period superlattices, taking into account the effects of conduction and valence band mixing, quantum confinement, pseudomorphic strain, and magnetic field on the calculated dispersions. Magnetotransport measurements over a variable temperature range (390 mK to 294 K) show anisotropic transport exhibiting a striking magnetoresistance and show Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, the latter being indicative of high quality material synthesis. The measurements also reveal the existence of at least two carrier populations contributing to in-plane conductance in the structure.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1809120
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10180828
Journal Name:
Materials Advances
ISSN:
2633-5409
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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Fig. 3(b) shows the tunneling probability T according to the Kane two-band model in the three materials, In0.53Ga0.47As, GaAs, and GaN, following our observation of a similar electroluminescence mechanism in GaN/AlN RTDs (due to strong polarization field of wurtzite structures) [8]. The expression is Tinter = (2/9)∙exp[(-2 ∙Ug 2 ∙me)/(2h∙P∙E)], where Ug is the bandgap energy, P is the valence-to-conduction-band momentum matrix element, and E is the electric field. Values for the highest calculated internal E fields for the InGaAs and GaN are also shown, indicating that Tinter in those structures approaches values of ~10-5. As shown, a GaAs RTD would require an internal field of ~6×105 V/cm, which is rarely realized in standard GaAs RTDs, perhaps explaining why there have been few if any reports of room-temperature electroluminescence in the GaAs devices. [1] E.R. Brown,et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., vol. 58, 2291, 1991. [5] S. 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