skip to main content


Title: DSA-10: a prototype array for localizing fast radio bursts
ABSTRACT The Deep Synoptic Array 10-dish prototype (DSA-10) is an instrument designed to detect and localize fast radio bursts with arcsecond accuracy in real time. Deployed at Owens Valley Radio Observatory, it consists of ten 4.5-m diameter dishes, equipped with a 250-MHz bandwidth dual polarization receiver, centred at 1.4 GHz. The 20 input signals are digitized and field programmable gate arrays are used to transform the data to the frequency domain and transmit it over ethernet. A series of computer servers buffer both raw data samples and perform a real time search for fast radio bursts on the incoherent sum of all inputs. If a pulse is detected, the raw data surrounding the pulse are written to disc for coherent processing and imaging. The prototype system was operational from 2017 June to 2018 February conducting a drift scan search. Giant pulses from the Crab Pulsar were used to test the detection and imaging pipelines. The 10-dish prototype system was brought online again in 2019 March, and will gradually be replaced with the new DSA-110, a 110-dish system, over the next 2 yr to improve sensitivity and localization accuracy.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1836018
NSF-PAR ID:
10189318
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
489
Issue:
1
ISSN:
0035-8711
Page Range / eLocation ID:
919 to 927
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. null (Ed.)
    ABSTRACT The origin of fast radio bursts (FRBs) still remains a mystery, even with the increased number of discoveries in the last 3 yr. Growing evidence suggests that some FRBs may originate from magnetars. Large, single-dish telescopes such as Arecibo Observatory (AO) and Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have the sensitivity to detect FRB 121102-like bursts at gigaparsec distances. Here, we present searches using AO and GBT that aimed to find potential radio bursts at 11 sites of past gamma-ray bursts that show evidence for the birth of a magnetar. We also performed a search towards GW170817, which has a merger remnant whose nature remains uncertain. We place $10\sigma$ fluence upper limits of ≈0.036 Jy ms at 1.4 GHz and ≈0.063 Jy ms at 4.5 GHz for the AO data and fluence upper limits of ≈0.085 Jy ms at 1.4 GHz and ≈0.098 Jy ms at 1.9 GHz for the GBT data, for a maximum pulse width of ≈42 ms. The AO observations had sufficient sensitivity to detect any FRB of similar luminosity to the one recently detected from the Galactic magnetar SGR 1935+2154. Assuming a Schechter function for the luminosity function of FRBs, we find that our non-detections favour a steep power-law index (α ≲ −1.1) and a large cut-off luminosity (L0 ≳ 1041 erg s−1). 
    more » « less
  2. Abstract

    Faraday rotation measures (RMs) of fast radio bursts (FRBs) offer the prospect of directly measuring extragalactic magnetic fields. We present an analysis of the RMs of 10 as yet nonrepeating FRBs detected and localized to host galaxies with robust redshift measurements by the 63-antenna prototype of the Deep Synoptic Array (DSA-110). We combine this sample with published RMs of 15 localized FRBs, nine of which are repeating sources. For each FRB in the combined sample, we estimate the host-galaxy dispersion measure (DM) contributions and extragalactic RM. We find compelling evidence that the extragalactic components of FRB RMs are often dominated by contributions from the host-galaxy interstellar medium (ISM). Specifically, we find that both repeating and as yet nonrepeating FRBs show a correlation between the host DM and host RM in the rest frame, and we find an anticorrelation between extragalactic RM (in the observer frame) and redshift for nonrepeaters, as expected if the magnetized plasma is in the host galaxy. Important exceptions to the ISM origin include a dense, magnetized circumburst medium in some repeating FRBs, and the intracluster medium of host or intervening galaxy clusters. We find that the estimated ISM magnetic-field strengths,B¯, are characteristically ∼1–2μG larger than those inferred from Galactic radio pulsars. This suggests either increased ISM magnetization in FRB hosts in comparison with the Milky Way, or that FRBs preferentially reside in regions of increased magnetic-field strength within their hosts.

     
    more » « less
  3. ABSTRACT With the upcoming commensal surveys for Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs), and their high candidate rate, usage of machine learning algorithms for candidate classification is a necessity. Such algorithms will also play a pivotal role in sending real-time triggers for prompt follow-ups with other instruments. In this paper, we have used the technique of Transfer Learning to train the state-of-the-art deep neural networks for classification of FRB and Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) candidates. These are convolutional neural networks which work on radio frequency-time and dispersion measure-time images as the inputs. We trained these networks using simulated FRBs and real RFI candidates from telescopes at the Green Bank Observatory. We present 11 deep learning models, each with an accuracy and recall above 99.5 per cent on our test data set comprising of real RFI and pulsar candidates. As we demonstrate, these algorithms are telescope and frequency agnostic and are able to detect all FRBs with signal-to-noise ratios above 10 in ASKAP and Parkes data. We also provide an open-source python package fetch (Fast Extragalactic Transient Candidate Hunter) for classification of candidates, using our models. Using fetch, these models can be deployed along with any commensal search pipeline for real-time candidate classification. 
    more » « less
  4. Abstract

    We report the detection and interferometric localization of the repeating fast radio burst (FRB) source FRB 20220912A during commissioning observations with the Deep Synoptic Array (DSA-110). Two bursts were detected from FRB 20220912A, one each on 2022 October 18 and 2022 October 25. The best-fit position is (R.A. J2000, decl. J2000) = (23:09:04.9, +48:42:25.4), with a 90% confidence error ellipse with radii ±2″ and ±1″ in R.A. and decl., respectively. The two bursts are polarized, and we find a Faraday rotation measure that is consistent with the low value of +0.6 rad m−2reported by CHIME/FRB. The DSA-110 localization overlaps with the galaxy PSO J347.2702+48.7066 at a redshiftz= 0.0771, which we identify as the likely host. PSO J347.2702+48.7066 has a stellar mass of approximately 1010M, modest internal dust extinction, and a star formation rate likely in excess of 0.1Myr−1. The host-galaxy contribution to the dispersion measure is likely ≲50 pc cm−3. The FRB 20220912A source is therefore likely viewed along a tenuous plasma column through the host galaxy.

     
    more » « less
  5. Abstract We present an analysis of a densely repeating sample of bursts from the first repeating fast radio burst, FRB 121102. We reanalyzed the data used by Gourdji et al. and detected 93 additional bursts using our single-pulse search pipeline. In total, we detected 133 bursts in three hours of data at a center frequency of 1.4 GHz using the Arecibo telescope, and develop robust modeling strategies to constrain the spectro-temporal properties of all of the bursts in the sample. Most of the burst profiles show a scattering tail, and burst spectra are well modeled by a Gaussian with a median width of 230 MHz. We find a lack of emission below 1300 MHz, consistent with previous studies of FRB 121102. We also find that the peak of the log-normal distribution of wait times decreases from 207 to 75 s using our larger sample of bursts, as compared to that of Gourdji et al. Our observations do not favor either Poissonian or Weibull distributions for the burst rate distribution. We searched for periodicity in the bursts using multiple techniques, but did not detect any significant period. The cumulative burst energy distribution exhibits a broken power-law shape, with the lower- and higher-energy slopes of −0.4 ± 0.1 and −1.8 ± 0.2, with the break at (2.3 ± 0.2) × 10 37 erg. We provide our burst fitting routines as a Python package burstfit 4 4 https://github.com/thepetabyteproject/burstfit that can be used to model the spectrogram of any complex fast radio burst or pulsar pulse using robust fitting techniques. All of the other analysis scripts and results are publicly available. 5 5 https://github.com/thepetabyteproject/FRB121102 
    more » « less