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Title: Managing State for Failure Resiliency in Network Function Virtualization
Ensuring high scalability (elastic scale-out and consolidation), as well as high availability (failure resiliency) are critical in encouraging adoption of software-based network functions (NFs). In recent years, two paradigms have evolved in terms of the way the NFs manage their state - namely the Stateful (state is coupled with the NF instance) and a Stateless (state is externalized to a datastore) manner. These two paradigms present unique challenges and opportunities for ensuring high scalability and high availability of NFs and NF chains. In this work, we assess the impact on ensuring the correctness of NF state including the implications of non-determinism in packet processing, and carefully analyze and present the benefits and disadvantages of the two state management paradigms. We leverage OpenNetVM and Redis in-memory datastore to implement both state management paradigms and empirically compare the two. Although the stateless paradigm is desirable for elastic scaling, our experimental results show that, even at line-rate packet processing (10 Gbps), stateful NFs can achieve chain-level failover across servers in a LAN incurring less than 10% performance. The state-of-the-art stateless counterparts incur severe throughput penalties. We observe 30-85% overhead on normal processing, depending on the mode of state updated to the externalized datastore.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1823236 1763548 1823270
NSF-PAR ID:
10189820
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2020 IEEE International Symposium on Local and Metropolitan Area Networks (LANMAN
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 6
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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