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Title: Neutron-capture elements in dwarf galaxies III: A homogenized analysis of 13 dwarf spheroidal and ultra-faint galaxies
We present a large homogeneous set of stellar parameters and abundances across a broad range of metallicities, involving 13 classical dwarf spheroidal (dSph) and ultra-faint dSph (UFD) galaxies. In total this study includes 380 stars in Fornax, Sagittarius, Sculptor, Sextans, Carina, Ursa Minor, Draco, Reticulum II, Bootes I, Ursa Major II, Leo I, Segue I, and Triangulum II. This sample represents the largest, homogeneous, high-resolution study of dSph galaxies to date. With our homogeneously derived catalog, we are able to search for similar and deviating trends across different galaxies. We investigate the mass dependence of the individual systems on the production of α-elements, but also try to shed light on the long-standing puzzle of the dominant production site of r-process elements. We use data from the Keck observatory archive and the ESO reduced archive to reanalyze stars from these 13 dSph galaxies. We automatize the step of obtaining stellar parameters, but run a full spectrum synthesis to derive all abundances except for iron. The homogenized set of abundances yielded the unique possibility to derive a relation between the onset of type Ia supernovae and the stellar mass of the galaxy. Furthermore, we derived a formula to estimate the evolution of more » α-elements. Placing all abundances consistently on the same scale is crucial to answer questions about the chemical history of galaxies. By homogeneously analysing Ba and Eu in the 13 systems, we have traced the onset of the s-process and found it to increase with metallicity as a function of the galaxy's stellar mass. Moreover, the r-process material correlates with the α-elements indicating some co-production of these, which in turn would point towards rare core-collapse supernovae rather than binary neutron star mergers as host for the r-process at low [Fe/H] in the investigated dSph systems. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1927130
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10193029
Journal Name:
ArXivorg
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
2001.01195
ISSN:
2331-8422
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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