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Title: Usage Patterns of Wideband Display Environments In e-Science Research, Development and Training
Abstract — SAGE (the Scalable Adaptive Graphics Environment) and its successor SAGE2 (the Scalable Amplified Group Environment) are operating systems for managing content across wideband display environments. This paper documents the prevalent usage patterns of SAGE-enabled display walls in support of the e-Science enterprise, based on nearly 15 years of observations of the SAGE community. These patterns will help guide e-Science users and cyberinfrastructure developers on how best to leverage large tiled display walls, and the types of software services that could be provided in the future.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1550126
NSF-PAR ID:
10193032
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Usage Patterns of Wideband Display Environments In e-Science Research, Development and Training, eScience 2019, San Diego, California, USA, September 24-27, 2019
Page Range / eLocation ID:
301 to 310
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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