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Title: Sensitivity of nitrate concentration‐discharge patterns to soil nitrate distribution and drainage properties in the vertical dimension
Award ID(s):
1831937
NSF-PAR ID:
10195802
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Hydrological Processes
Volume:
34
Issue:
11
ISSN:
0885-6087
Page Range / eLocation ID:
2477 to 2493
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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