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Title: A 3D-printed molecular ferroelectric metamaterial

Molecular ferroelectrics combine electromechanical coupling and electric polarizabilities, offering immense promise in stimuli-dependent metamaterials. Despite such promise, current physical realizations of mechanical metamaterials remain hindered by the lack of rapid-prototyping ferroelectric metamaterial structures. Here, we present a continuous rapid printing strategy for the volumetric deposition of water-soluble molecular ferroelectric metamaterials with precise spatial control in virtually any three-dimensional (3D) geometry by means of an electric-field–assisted additive manufacturing. We demonstrate a scaffold-supported ferroelectric crystalline lattice that enables self-healing and a reprogrammable stiffness for dynamic tuning of mechanical metamaterials with a long lifetime and sustainability. A molecular ferroelectric architecture with resonant inclusions then exhibits adaptive mitigation of incident vibroacoustic dynamic loads via an electrically tunable subwavelength-frequency band gap. The findings shown here pave the way for the versatile additive manufacturing of molecular ferroelectric metamaterials.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1847254 1904254
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10198510
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Volume:
117
Issue:
44
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
p. 27204-27210
ISSN:
0027-8424
Publisher:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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