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  1. Abstract

    Acoustic phased arrays are capable of steering and focusing a beam of sound via selective coordination of the spatial distribution of phase angles between multiple sound emitters. Constrained by the principle of reciprocity, conventional phased arrays exhibit identical transmission and reception patterns which limit the scope of their operation. This work presents a controllable space–time acoustic phased array which breaks time-reversal symmetry, and enables phononic transition in both momentum and energy spaces. By leveraging a dynamic phase modulation, the proposed linear phased array is no longer bound by the acoustic reciprocity, and supports asymmetric transmission and reception patterns that can be tuned independently at multiple channels. A foundational framework is developed to characterize and interpret the emergent nonreciprocal phenomena and is later validated against benchmark numerical experiments. The new phased array selectively alters the directional and frequency content of the incident signal and imparts a frequency conversion between different wave fields, which is further analyzed as a function of the imposed modulation. The space–time acoustic phased array enables unprecedented control over sound waves in a variety of applications ranging from ultrasonic imaging to non-destructive testing and underwater SONAR telecommunication.

  2. Abstract Automated inverse design methods are critical to the development of metamaterial systems that exhibit special user-demanded properties. While machine learning approaches represent an emerging paradigm in the design of metamaterial structures, the ability to retrieve inverse designs on-demand remains lacking. Such an ability can be useful in accelerating optimization-based inverse design processes. This paper develops an inverse design framework that provides this capability through the novel usage of invertible neural networks (INNs). We exploit an INN architecture that can be trained to perform forward prediction over a set of high-fidelity samples and automatically learns the reverse mapping with guaranteed invertibility. We apply this INN for modeling the frequency response of periodic and aperiodic phononic structures, with the performance demonstrated on vibration suppression of drill pipes. Training and testing samples are generated by employing a transfer matrix method. The INN models provide competitive forward and inverse prediction performance compared to typical deep neural networks (DNNs). These INN models are used to retrieve approximate inverse designs for a queried non-resonant frequency range; the inverse designs are then used to initialize a constrained gradient-based optimization process to find a more accurate inverse design that also minimizes mass. The INN-initialized optimizations are foundmore »to be generally superior in terms of the queried property and mass compared to randomly initialized and inverse DNN-initialized optimizations. Particle swarm optimization with INN-derived initial points is then found to provide even better solutions, especially for the higher-dimensional aperiodic structures.« less
  3. Abstract Energy dissipation in polymeric composite metamaterials requires special mathematical models owing to the viscoelastic nature of their constituents, namely, the polymeric matrix, bonding agent, and local resonators. Unlike traditional composites, viscoelastic metamaterials possess a unique ability to exhibit strong wave attenuation while retaining high stiffness as a result of the “metadamping” phenomenon attributed to local resonances. The objective of this work is to investigate viscoelastic metadamping in one-dimensional multibandgap metamaterials by combining the linear hereditary theory of viscoelasticity with the Floquet-Bloch theory of wave propagation in infinite elastic media. Important distinctions between metamaterial and phononic unit cell models are explained based on the free wave approach with wavenumber-eliminated damping-frequency band structures. The developed model enables viscoelastic metadamping to be investigated by varying two independent relaxation parameters describing the viscoelasticity level in the host structure and the integrated resonators. The dispersion mechanics within high damping regimes and the effects of boundary conditions on the damped response are detailed. The results reveal that in a multiresonator cell, strategic damping placement in the individual resonators plays a profound role in shaping intermediate dispersion branches and dictating the primary and secondary frequency regions of interest, within which attenuation is most required.
  4. Molecular ferroelectrics combine electromechanical coupling and electric polarizabilities, offering immense promise in stimuli-dependent metamaterials. Despite such promise, current physical realizations of mechanical metamaterials remain hindered by the lack of rapid-prototyping ferroelectric metamaterial structures. Here, we present a continuous rapid printing strategy for the volumetric deposition of water-soluble molecular ferroelectric metamaterials with precise spatial control in virtually any three-dimensional (3D) geometry by means of an electric-field–assisted additive manufacturing. We demonstrate a scaffold-supported ferroelectric crystalline lattice that enables self-healing and a reprogrammable stiffness for dynamic tuning of mechanical metamaterials with a long lifetime and sustainability. A molecular ferroelectric architecture with resonant inclusions then exhibits adaptive mitigation of incident vibroacoustic dynamic loads via an electrically tunable subwavelength-frequency band gap. The findings shown here pave the way for the versatile additive manufacturing of molecular ferroelectric metamaterials.