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Title: Back to Computational Transparency: Co-designing with Teachers to Integrate Computational Thinking in Science Classrooms
Integrating computational thinking (CT) in the science classroom presents the opportunity to simultaneously broaden participation in computing, enhance science content learning, and engage students in authentic scientific practice. However, there is a lot more to learn on how teachers might integrate CT activities within their existing curricula. In this work, we describe a process of co-design with researchers and teachers to develop CT-infused science curricula. Specifically, we present a case study of one veteran physics teacher whose conception of CT during a professional development institute changed over time. We use this case study to explore how CT is perceived in physics instruction, a field that has a long history of computational learning opportunities. We also discuss how a co-design process led to the development of a lens through which to identify fruitful opportunities to integrate CT activities in physics curricula which we term computational transparency–purposefully revealing the inner workings of computational tools that students already use in the classroom.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1842374 1640201
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10199196
Journal Name:
International Conference of the Learning Sciences
Issue:
Jun-2020
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
2069-2076
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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