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Title: A Direct-Conversion Digital Beamforming Array Receiver with 800 MHz Channel Bandwidth at 28 GHz using Xilinx RF SoC
This paper discusses early results associated with a fully-digital direct-conversion array receiver at 28 GHz. The proposed receiver makes use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) electronics, including the receiver chain. The design consists of a custom 28 GHz patch antenna sub-array providing gain in the elevation plane, with azimuthal plane beamforming provided by real-time digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms running on a Xilinx Radio Frequency System on Chip (RF SoC). The proposed array receiver employs element-wise fully-digital array processing that supports ADC sample rates up to 2 GS/second and up to 1 GHz of operating bandwidth per antenna. The RF mixed-signal data conversion circuits and DSP algorithms operate on a single-chip RFSoC solution installed on the Xilinx ZCU1275 prototyping platform.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1731290
NSF-PAR ID:
10205757
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2019 IEEE International Conference on Microwaves, Antennas, Communications and Electronic Systems (COMCAS)
Volume:
2019
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1-5
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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