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Title: Contextualizing, historicizing, and re-authoring data-as-text in the middle school science classroom
The ability to interpret, evaluate, and make data-based decisions is critical in the age of big data. Normative scripts around the use of data position them as a privileged epistemic form conferring authority through objectivity that can serve as a lever for effecting change. However, humans and materials shape how data are created and used which can reinscribe existing power relations in society at large (Van Wart, Lanouette & Parikh, 2020). Thus, research is needed on how learners can be supported to engage in critical data literacies through sociocultural perspectives. As a field intimately concerned with data-based reasoning, social justice, and design, the learning sciences is well-positioned to contribute to such an effort. This symposium brings together scholars to present theoretical frameworks and empirical studies on the design of learning spaces for critical data literacies. This collection supports a larger discussion around existing tensions, additional design considerations, and new methodologies.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1900606
NSF-PAR ID:
10209452
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Editor(s):
Gresalfi, M. and
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, 14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) 2020
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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