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Title: High-speed compressed-sensing fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of live cells

We present high-resolution, high-speed fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of live cells based on a compressed sensing scheme. By leveraging the compressibility of biological scenes in a specific domain, we simultaneously record the time-lapse fluorescence decay upon pulsed laser excitation within a large field of view. The resultant system, referred to as compressed FLIM, can acquire a widefield fluorescence lifetime image within a single camera exposure, eliminating the motion artifact and minimizing the photobleaching and phototoxicity. The imaging speed, limited only by the readout speed of the camera, is up to 100 Hz. We demonstrated the utility of compressed FLIM in imaging various transient dynamics at the microscopic scale.

Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2053080
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10209523
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Volume:
118
Issue:
3
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. e2004176118
ISSN:
0027-8424
Publisher:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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    WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY

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    STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S)

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