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Title: Strategies for visuospatial reasoning: Experiments in sufficiency and diversity
In this paper, we present the Visuospatial Reasoning Environment for Experimentation (VREE). VREE provides a simulated environment where intelligent agents interact with virtual objects while solving different visuospatial reasoning tasks. This paper shows how VREE is valuable for studying the sufficiency of visual imagery approaches for a large number of visuospatial reasoning tasks as well as how diverse strategies can be represented and studied within a single task. We present results from computational experiments using VREE on the block design task and on numerous subtests from the Leiter-R test battery on nonverbal intelligence.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1730044 1922697
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10209971
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Conference on Advances in Cognitive Systems (ACS)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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