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Title: Live Cell Imaging of Nuclear Actin Filaments and Heterochromatic Repair foci in Drosophila and Mouse Cells
Pericentromeric heterochromatin is mostly composed of repeated DNA sequences, which are prone to aberrant recombination during double-strand break (DSB) repair. Studies in Drosophila and mouse cells revealed that ‘safe’ homologous recombination (HR) repair of these sequences relies on the relocalization of repair sites to outside the heterochromatin domain before Rad51 recruitment. Relocalization requires a striking network of nuclear actin filaments (F-actin) and myosins that drive directed motions. Understanding this pathway requires the detection of nuclear actin filaments that are significantly less abundant than those in the cytoplasm, and the imaging and tracking of repair sites for long time periods. Here, we describe an optimized protocol for live cell imaging of nuclear F-actin in Drosophila cells, and for repair focus tracking in mouse cells, including: imaging setup, image processing approaches, and analysis methods. We emphasize approaches that can be applied to identify the most effective fluorescent markers for live cell imaging, strategies to minimize photobleaching and phototoxicity with a DeltaVision deconvolution microscope, and image processing and analysis methods using SoftWoRx and Imaris software. These approaches enable a deeper understanding of the spatial and temporal dynamics of heterochromatin repair and have broad applicability in the fields of nuclear architecture, nuclear dynamics, and more » DNA repair. « less
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1751197
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10212570
Journal Name:
Methods in molecular biology
ISSN:
0097-0816
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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