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Title: Effect magnitudes of operational-scale partial harvesting on residual tree growth and mortality of ten major tree species in Maine USA
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1920908 1915078
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10216196
Journal Name:
Forest Ecology and Management
Volume:
484
Issue:
C
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
118953
ISSN:
0378-1127
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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