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Title: MARS: discovering novel cell types across heterogeneous single-cell experiments
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1918940 1835598 2030477 2030459
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10219017
Journal Name:
Nature Methods
Volume:
17
Issue:
12
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1200 to 1206
ISSN:
1548-7091
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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