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Title: DATA-MODEL COMPARISONS OF STORM PROCESSES DURING HURRICANE HARVEY
During tropical cyclones, processes including dune erosion, overwash, inundation, and storm-surge ebb can rapidly reshape barrier islands, thereby increasing coastal hazards and flood exposure inland. Relatively few measurements are available to evaluate the physical processes shaping coastal systems close to shore during these extreme events as it is inherently challenging to obtain reliable field data due to energetic waves and rapid bed level changes which can damage or shift instrumentation. However, such observations are critical toward improving and validating model forecasts of coastal storm hazards. To address these data and knowledge gaps, this study links hydrodynamic and meteorological observations with numerical modeling to 1) perform data-model inter-comparisons of relevant storm processes, namely infragravity (IG) waves, storm surge, and meteotsunamis; and 2) better understand the relative importance of each of these processes during hurricane impact.Recorded Presentation from the vICCE (YouTube Link): https://youtu.be/kUizy8nK3TU  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1661052
NSF-PAR ID:
10221500
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Coastal Engineering Proceedings
Issue:
36v
ISSN:
0589-087X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
40
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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