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Title: Overview of the Cosmic Axion Spin Precession Experiment (CASPEr)
An overview of our experimental program to search for axion and axion-like-particle (ALP) dark matter using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques is presented. An oscillating axion field can exert a time-varying torque on nuclear spins either directly or via generation of an oscillating nuclear electric dipole moment (EDM). Magnetic resonance techniques can be used to detect such an effect. The first-generation experiments explore many decades of ALP parameter space beyond the current astrophysical and laboratory bounds. It is anticipated that future versions of the experiments will be sensitive to the axions associated with quantum chromodynamics (QCD) having masses <10^(−9) eV/c^2.
Authors:
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Editors:
Carosi, G.; Rybka, G.
Award ID(s):
1707875
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10222563
Journal Name:
Springer proceedings in physics
Volume:
245
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
105-121
ISSN:
0930-8989
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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