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Title: Exploiting common senses: sensory ecology meets wildlife conservation and management.
Multidisciplinary approaches to conservation and wildlife management are often e ective in addressing complex, multi-factor problems. Emerging elds such as conservation physiology and conservation behaviour can provide innovative solutions and management strategies for target species and systems. Sensory ecology combines the study of ‘how animals acquire’ and process sensory stimuli from their environments, and the ecological and evolutionary signi cance of ‘how animals respond’ to this information. We review the bene ts that sensory ecology can bring to wildlife conservation and management by discussing case studies across major taxa and sensory modalities. Conservation practices informed by a sensory ecology approach include the amelioration of sensory traps, control of invasive species, reduction of human–wildlife con icts and relocation and establishment of new populations of endangered species. We illustrate that sensory ecology can facilitate the understanding of mechanistic ecological and physiological explanations underlying particular conservation issues and also can help develop innovative solutions to ameliorate conservation problems.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1846004
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10223442
Journal Name:
Conservation physiology
Volume:
9
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
coab002
ISSN:
2051-1434
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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