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Title: What's The Point?: Tradeoffs Between Effectiveness and Social Perception When Using Mixed Reality to Enhance Gesturally Limited Robots
Mixed Reality visualizations provide a powerful new approach for enabling gestural capabilities on non-humanoid robots. This paper explores two different categories of mixed-reality deictic gestures for armless robots: a virtual arrow positioned over a target referent (a non-ego-sensitive allocentric gesture) and a virtual arm positioned over the gesturing robot (an ego-sensitive allocentric gesture). Specifically, we present the results of a within-subjects Mixed Reality HRI experiment (N=23) exploring the trade-offs between these two types of gestures with respect to both objective performance and subjective social perceptions. Our results show a clear trade-off between performance and social perception, with non-ego-sensitive allocentric gestures enabling faster reaction time and higher accuracy, but ego-sensitive gestures enabling higher perceived social presence, anthropomorphism, and likability.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1909864 1823245
NSF-PAR ID:
10223466
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction
Page Range / eLocation ID:
177 to 186
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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