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Title: Fast etch recipe creation with automated model-based process optimization
A method for automated creation and optimization of multistep etch recipes is presented. Here we demonstrate how an automated model-based process optimization approach can cut the cost and time of recipe creation by 75% or more as compared with traditional experimental design approaches. Underlying the success of the method are reduced-order physics-based models for simulating the process and performing subsequent analysis of the multi dimensional parameter space. SandBox Studio™ AI is used to automate the model selection, model calibration and subsequent process optimization. The process engineer is only required to provide the incoming stack and experimental measurements for model calibration and updates. The method is applied to the optimization of a channel etch for 3D NAND devices. A reduced-order model that captures the physics and chemistry of the multistep reaction is automatically selected and calibrated. A mirror AI model is simultaneously and automatically created to enable nearly instantaneous predictions across the large process space. The AI model is much faster to evaluate and is used to make a Quilt™, a 2D projection of etch performance in the multidimensional process parameter space. A Quilt™ process map is then used to automatically determine the optimal process window to achieve the target CDs.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Editors:
Bannister, Julie; Mohanty, Nihar
Award ID(s):
1951245
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10224478
Journal Name:
Proc. SPIE 11615, Advanced Etch Technology and Process Integration for Nanopatterning X
Volume:
11615
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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