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Title: High Internal Quantum Efficiency from AlGaN-delta-GaN Quantum Well at 260 nm
igh internal quantum efficiency (85%) was realized from the AlGaN-delta-GaN quantum well (QW) structure grown on a conventional AlN/sapphire template by Molecular Beam Epitaxy. The peak emission wavelength is observed at 260 nm.
Authors:
; ; ; ;  ; ;
Award ID(s):
1839196
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10226553
Journal Name:
Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
AF1I.2
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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