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Title: ScaleNet - Improve CNNs through Recursively Rescaling Objects
Deep networks are often not scale-invariant hence their performance can vary wildly if recognizable objects are at an unseen scale occurring only at testing time. In this paper, we propose ScaleNet, which recursively predicts object scale in a deep learning framework. With an explicit objective to predict the scale of objects in images, ScaleNet enables pretrained deep learning models to identify objects in the scales that are not present in their training sets. By recursively calling ScaleNet, one can generalize to very large scale changes unseen in the training set. To demonstrate the robustness of our proposed framework, we conduct experiments with pretrained as well as fine-tuned classification and detection frameworks on MNIST, CIFAR-10, and MS COCO datasets and results reveal that our proposed framework significantly boosts the performances of deep networks.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1751402
NSF-PAR ID:
10229099
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence
Volume:
34
Issue:
07
ISSN:
2159-5399
Page Range / eLocation ID:
11426 to 11433
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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