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Title: Improved Precipitation Typing Using POSS Spectral Modal Analysis
Abstract The Precipitation Occurrence Sensor System (POSS) is a small X-band Doppler radar that measures the Doppler velocity spectra from precipitation falling in a small volume near the sensor. The sensor records a 2D frequency of occurrence matrix of the velocity and power at the mode of each spectrum measured over 1 min. The centroid of the distribution of these modes, along with other spectral parameters, defines a data vector input to a multiple discriminant analysis (MDA) for classification of the precipitation type. This requires the a priori determination of a training set for different types, particle size distributions (PSDs), and wind speed conditions. A software model combines POSS system parameters, a particle scattering cross section, and terminal velocity models, to simulate the real-time Doppler signal measured by the system for different PSDs and wind speeds. This is processed in the same manner as the system hardware to produce bootstrap samples of the modal centroid distributions for the MDA training set. MDA results are compared to images from the Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) at the MASCRAD site near Easton, Colorado, and to the CSU–CHILL X-band radar observations from Greeley, Colorado. In the four case studies presented, POSS successfully identified precipitation more » transitions through a range of types (rain, graupel, rimed dendrites, aggregates, unrimed dendrites). Also two separate events of hail were reported and confirmed by the images. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1901585
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10232036
Journal Name:
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology
Volume:
38
Issue:
3
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
537 to 554
ISSN:
0739-0572
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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