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Title: Signal Transport and Digital Signal Processing for the ALPACA L band Array Feed
The Advanced L band Phased Array Camera for Arecibo (ALPACA) will rely on RF-over-fiber signal transport and hybrid FPGA/GPU signal processing hardware for calibration, beamforming, and imaging. We report on signal transport system development, phase and gain stability requirements, and array signal processing algorithm development.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1636645
NSF-PAR ID:
10232256
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2021 15th European Conference on Antennas and Propagation (EuCAP)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 3
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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