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Title: Anchoring Computational Thinking in Upper Elementary Physical Science Through Problem-Centered Storytelling and Play
In an effort to infuse computational thinking practices in upper elementary science, and to promote positive student dispositions toward STEM, this project investigates a new narrative-centered maker environment involving: 1) problem-based learning research and modeling of physical science concepts, 2) application of learned concepts to original digital stories created using block-based programming, and 3) further communication of science understanding through play with fabricated story sets and characters reflective of narratives.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1921503
NSF-PAR ID:
10247745
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) 2020
Volume:
3
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1743-1744
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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