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Title: Cell-free systems for accelerating glycoprotein expression and biomanufacturing
Abstract Protein glycosylation, the enzymatic modification of amino acid sidechains with sugar moieties, plays critical roles in cellular function, human health, and biotechnology. However, studying and producing defined glycoproteins remains challenging. Cell-free glycoprotein synthesis systems, in which protein synthesis and glycosylation are performed in crude cell extracts, offer new approaches to address these challenges. Here, we review versatile, state-of-the-art systems for biomanufacturing glycoproteins in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell-free systems with natural and synthetic N-linked glycosylation pathways. We discuss existing challenges and future opportunities in the use of cell-free systems for the design, manufacture, and study of glycoprotein biomedicines.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1936789
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10249265
Journal Name:
Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology
Volume:
47
Issue:
11
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
977 to 991
ISSN:
1367-5435
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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