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Title: Elementary teachers’ beliefs about teaching mathematics and science: Implications for argumentation.
Teachers in the elementary grades often teach all subjects and are expected to have appropriate content knowledge of a wide range of disciplines. Current recommendations suggest teachers should integrate multiple disciplines into the same lesson, for instance, when teaching integrated STEM lessons. Although there are many similarities between STEM fields, there are also epistemological differences to be understood by students and teachers (see, e.g., Conner & Kittleson, 2009). How to teach STEM lessons without ignoring the unique characteristics, depth, and rigor of each discipline is an open question (Kertil & Gurel, 2016). This study investigated teachers’ beliefs about teaching mathematics and science using argumentation and the epistemological and contextual factors that may have influenced these beliefs.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1741910
NSF-PAR ID:
10250018
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Editor(s):
Sacristan, AI; Cortes-Zavala, JC; Ruiz-Arias, PM
Date Published:
Journal Name:
PME-NA
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1951-52
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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