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Title: Magnetic field reveals vanishing Hall response in the normal state of stripe-ordered cuprates
Abstract The origin of the weak insulating behavior of the resistivity, i.e. $${\rho }_{xx}\propto {\mathrm{ln}}\,(1/T)$$ ρ x x ∝ ln ( 1 / T ) , revealed when magnetic fields ( H ) suppress superconductivity in underdoped cuprates has been a longtime mystery. Surprisingly, the high-field behavior of the resistivity observed recently in charge- and spin-stripe-ordered La-214 cuprates suggests a metallic, as opposed to insulating, high-field normal state. Here we report the vanishing of the Hall coefficient in this field-revealed normal state for all $$T\ <\ (2-6){T}_{{\rm{c}}}^{0}$$ T < ( 2 − 6 ) T c 0 , where $${T}_{{\rm{c}}}^{0}$$ T c 0 is the zero-field superconducting transition temperature. Our measurements demonstrate that this is a robust fundamental property of the normal state of cuprates with intertwined orders, exhibited in the previously unexplored regime of T and H . The behavior of the high-field Hall coefficient is fundamentally different from that in other cuprates such as YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+ x and YBa 2 Cu 4 O 8 , and may imply an approximate particle-hole symmetry that is unique to stripe-ordered cuprates. Our results highlight the important role of the competing orders in determining the normal state of more » cuprates. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1707785
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10250826
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Volume:
12
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2041-1723
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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