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Title: Modulation of Turbulent Flow by Surrogate Asian Carp Eggs
In geophysical flows, the presence of sediment in suspension and transport can play an important role in modifying the turbulent properties of the carrier fluid. Much research has focused on the effects of relatively small diameter (less than 1 mm) quartz-density (2.65 g/cm3) particles on turbulent flow. Asian carp is a wide-spread invasive aquatic species in the U.S., causing severe ecological problems in rivers and lakes. Unlike sediment, Asian carp eggs are semi-buoyant particles (~1.05 g/cm3 when initially spawned and ~1.00 g/cm3 in the post-water-hardening period) whose diameter stabilizes to approximately 5 mm. This paper examines how turbulent flow is affected by the presence of particles serving as surrogates for Asian carp eggs as a function of turbulence intensity. Experiments were conducted in a mixing box with the oscillating grid placed near the bottom boundary, and 2D PIV was used to quantify the turbulent characteristics of the carrier fluid. Five paired experiments with and without Asian carp egg surrogate particles were conducted. Results show that under different grid oscillation frequencies (2 to 6 Hz), the mean kinetic energy of the carrier fluid decreased slightly in the presence of the particles, but the turbulent kinetic energy of the fluid did not change appreciably. This suggests strongly that Asian carp eggs in suspension do not modify turbulence intensity of the carrier fluid. These experimental results provide important insight into the entrainment, transport, and deposition of Asian carp eggs, which can inform models to predict the future spread of this invasive species.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1659909
NSF-PAR ID:
10252283
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2020
Page Range / eLocation ID:
129 to 136
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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